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Lymphedema, Surgery, and Radiation: What are my risks?

By: Ryan Perkins, M.D. -- Many breast cancer patients come to me with concerns about lymphedema, the chronic collection of fluid in the tissues just beneath the skin’s surface. When multiple lymph nodes are removed from the underarm during breast cancer surgery—also called an axillary lymph node dissection (ALND)—the flow of lymph fluid is changed. This makes it harder for fluid to flow out of the area of the chest, breast, and arm, which can lead to lymphedema.

Survivor Spotlight: Pat Killingsworth Blazing the Trail to Survivorship

When 57-year-old Pat Killingsworth was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2007, he never dreamed how the disease would change his life. Given only three to four years to live, the ex-history teacher turned successful real estate professional got busy learning all he could about bone marrow cancer. 

Receiving Optimal Cancer Care from Multiple Oncologists

By: Scot Ackerman, M.D. -- Coordinating complex cancer care can be challenging on its own, but if a patient travels frequently or is a part-time resident of two states, the process can become overwhelming.  Following these basic steps can help ensure you receive the best possible cancer care while avoiding duplicate medical tests, overlapping treatment, and any confusion.

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